CDRouter Support

Rebuild the NTA1000 Operating System

knowledge-base version 11.3

Which upgrade do you need?

This guide provides detailed instructions for rebuilding the NTA1000 internal disk(s) based on custom CentOS disk images provided by QA Cafe. Rebuilding a disk may be necessary due to a disk failure, accidental deletion of system files, or to bring an older NTA1000 system up to date.

Rebuilding the internal disk(s) is not necessary for simply upgrading the CDRouter software. For instructions on how to upgrade CDRouter on your system, please refer to this document:

Before you start

Please be aware that installing a new disk image will erase all data from that disk and will require a full backup and restoration of any data you wish to keep.

The detailed procedure below will guide you through the steps required to back up your data and install the CentOS disk image(s). Once the installation is complete, you will be able to restore your CDRouter configuration settings and test results, and continue testing where you left off.

Please note:

  • You will need an empty 8 GB or larger USB flash drive in order to complete this procedure. The flash drive will be formatted and erased during this process.

  • All commands shown in this procedure should be run as root

  • NTA1000 v2 hardware has a single internal hard drive, therefore there is a single disk image to restore. NTA1000 v3, v4, v5, and v6 hardware have two internal drives, therefore there are two disk images to restore. In this case, you will have the choice to restore either or both disks.

  • Please note that the NTA1000 internal hard drive(s) will be completely erased and reformatted as part of this procedure. Any data or separate partitions that may be present on these drives will be deleted.

Upgrade procedure

BackUp CDRouter Configuration Files and Test Results

Before starting, please make sure that you have backed up all of your CDRouter data to a remote location. If you use the CDRouter web interface for all of your CDRouter testing, all devices, configs, packages, and results are managed by CDRouter under the /usr/cdrouter-data directory (/usr/buddyweb directory for CDRouter versions prior to 10.0).

If you do not use the CDRouter web interface, then you will need to locate your CDRouter configuration files and test results yourself, along with any other files that you wish to save. Anything that you do not back up will be lost.

More information about backing up your CDRouter data can be found in the following Knowledge Base article on the QA Cafe Customer Support website: What’s the best way to back up and restore CDRouter?.

Download the NTA1000 Disk Image

The appropriate NTA1000 disk image can be downloaded from the QA Cafe website. NTA1000 v6 systems must use the 6.x image. All previous hardware versions must use the 5.x image. (Note: the actual file name and details may differ from the examples below):

NTA1000 v6

  • Download Link: nta1000-6.0.img
  • File Size: 3,948,937,216 bytes
  • MD5 Checksum: 14e39af89e20df431d645bbf50cd1957

NTA1000 v5 and earlier

  • Download Link: nta1000-5.5.img
  • File Size: 7,872,184,320 bytes
  • MD5 Checksum: 278fac7a78d338fdd6e3a9cb8a21c590

Verify that your copy of the image file has the correct file size and MD5 checksum to be sure there were no errors when downloading it to your system. Use the information with the link above to verify your downloaded disk image file.

NTA1000 v6

root@nta1000:/home/qacafe/Downloads# ls -l nta1000-6.0.img
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 3948937216 Jul 12 15:08 nta1000-6.0.img

root@nta1000:/home/qacafe/Downloads# md5sum nta1000-6.0.img
14e39af89e20df431d645bbf50cd1957  nta1000-6.0.img

NTA1000 v5 and earlier

root@nta1000:/home/qacafe/Downloads# ls -l nta1000-5.5.img
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 7872184320 Mar  6 14:37 nta1000-5.5.img

root@nta1000:/home/qacafe/Downloads# md5sum nta1000-5.5.img
278fac7a78d338fdd6e3a9cb8a21c590  nta1000-5.5.img

Copy NTA1000 Disk Image to flash drive

The instructions below assume you will use a Linux system, which is also the prefered method.

Insert the USB flash drive into the machine where the system image file resides and determine its assigned device name.

NOTE: It is very important that you correctly determine device name of your flash drive. Copying the NTA1000 disk image to the device name of your system’s hard drive or any other device will overwrite and destroy the contents of that drive!

You can check the output from the "lsusb" command after inserting the USB flash drive in order to confirm that the system recognizes the flash drive.

In the example below, we are using a “SanDisk Cruzer Glide” flash drive:

root@nta1000:/root# lsusb
Bus 008 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
Bus 007 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
Bus 006 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
Bus 005 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
Bus 004 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
Bus 003 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
Bus 002 Device 005: ID 0781:5575 SanDisk Corp. 
Bus 002 Device 004: ID 046d:c313 Logitech, Inc. 
Bus 002 Device 003: ID 0461:4d64 Primax Electronics, Ltd 
Bus 002 Device 002: ID 1a40:0101 TERMINUS TECHNOLOGY INC. USB-2.0 4-Port HUB
Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub

Since the USB flash drive will likely be auto-mounted by the system, the easiest way to determine the device name is to use the "df" command.

Before the USB flash drive is inserted:

root@nta1000:/root# df
Filesystem      1K-blocks       Used  Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda3       117780120    7902264  103871928   8% /
tmpfs             3994260         84    3994176   1% /dev/shm
/dev/sda1          999320      69352     861156   8% /boot
/dev/sdb1      3845578572 1362389988 2287821324  38% /userdata

After the USB flash drive is inserted:

root@nta1000:/root# df
Filesystem      1K-blocks       Used  Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda3       117780120    7902264  103871928   8% /
tmpfs             3994260         84    3994176   1% /dev/shm
/dev/sda1          999320      69352     861156   8% /boot
/dev/sdb1      3845578572 1362389988 2287821324  38% /userdata
/dev/sdc1         3847828    3496544     351284  91% /run/media/bill/stuff

Note that a new entry appeared in the df output after the USB flash drive was inserted. This will give you the device name that was assigned to the flash drive, in this case /dev/sdc (not /dev/sdc1). This information will be needed below.

After determining the device name, make sure the USB drive is NOT mounted.

root@nta1000:/root# umount /run/media/bill/stuff

Note: the mountpoint may be different in your setup. The df command may be used again to verify the entry that appeared after the flash drive was inserted is now gone.

Use the device name of your flash drive with the "dd" utility to copy the contents of the NTA1000 disk image file to the USB drive.

This command should take about 5-10 minutes to complete:

NTA1000 v6

dd if=nta1000-6.0.img of=/dev/sdc bs=1M 

NTA1000 v5 and earlier

dd if=nta1000-5.5.img of=/dev/sdc bs=1M 

When finished, remove the USB drive and insert it into one of the two front USB ports of the target NTA1000.

Update NTA1000 BIOS to boot from USB Flash Drive

In order for the NTA1000 to boot from the USB flash drive, you will need to update the system BIOS settings. The BIOS is different depending on the NTA1000 hardware version.

NTA1000 v6 BIOS

  • Make sure the USB flash drive is inserted into the NTA1000 and reboot the system.
  • Press the <DELETE> key to enter the system BIOS interface.
  • Navigate to Boot >> Boot Option #1, Enter
    • Select the USB drive (not the UEFI USB drive), Enter
  • Navigate to Save & Exit >> Save Changes and Reset, Enter

NTA1000 v5 BIOS

  • Make sure the USB flash drive is inserted into the NTA1000 and reboot the system.
  • Press the <DELETE> key to enter the system BIOS interface.
  • Navigate to Boot >> Boot Option #1, Enter
    • Select the USB drive (not the UEFI USB drive), Enter
  • Navigate to Save & Exit >> Save Changes and Exit, Enter

NTA1000 v4, v3, v2 BIOS

  • Make sure the USB flash drive is inserted into the NTA1000 and reboot the system.
  • Press the <DELETE> key to enter the system BIOS interface.
  • Navigate to Boot >> Hard Disk Drives >> 1st Drive`, Enter
    • Select the USB drive, Enter
  • Navigate to Exit >> Save Changes and Exit, Enter

Install NTA1000 Disk Image from USB Flash Drive

The NTA1000 should now boot from the flash drive. After the spash screen, you will see instructions guiding you through the reimage process.

For NTA1000 v6, v5, v4, and v3 hardware, there are two internal drives, so there are two drive images to restore. Only one drive image is restored at a time, and you can decide to restore either or both drives. If you plan to restore both drives, the order of the restores makes no difference.

If there are no more disks to restore, choose to Poweroff the system.

Once the system finishes shutting down, remove the USB drive, locate the power switch on the rear of the NTA1000, turn the power switch off, wait 10 seconds, and turn it back on.

Restore CDRouter Configuration Files and Test Results

Before installing CDRouter, we recommend restoring your old CDRouter configs, packages, and test results from your backup location. If you use the CDRouter web interface for your CDRouter testing, you will need to restore the entire /usr/cdrouter-data directory (or the entire /usr/buddyweb directory for CDRouter versions prior to 10.0). Please see our Knowledge Base for more details: What’s the best way to back up and restore CDRouter?

Download and Install CDRouter

Open a web browser on the NTA1000 and connect to the QA Cafe Customer Lounge to download the CDRouter installer.

Be sure to download the appropriate product depending on what your NTA1000 system is licensed for. You will not be able to activate and use CDRouter if the installed product does not match your license. If you are unsure which product to install, you can check the license for your NTA1000 in the Customer Lounge as well.

Run the CDRouter installer to install CDRouter onto the NTA1000. Please see the following guide for details: CDRouter Installation and Upgrade Guide

Update License with New CDRouter System-ID

Once the CDRouter installation completes, your NTA1000 may have a new CDRouter system-id. CDRouter will not be able to acquire a valid license file until we have updated your license with the new system-id.

Please send the new CDRouter system-id displayed at the end of the installation script along with the QA Cafe serial number of your NTA1000 to Support, and we will update your license with the new system-id. You can also find the system-id by pulling up the CDRouter web interface in your browser. A third way is to run the following command in a terminal window:

cdrouter-cli -show-system-id

Once your new system-id has been registered with your CDRouter license, you will need to download and install a new license file. This can be done automatically from the CDRouter web interface or by running the following command in a terminal window:

cdrouter-cli -update-license

If your NTA1000 does not have Internet access, you may download your license file from the QA Cafe Customer Support site to another machine, then copy it over and install it manually. Instructions can be found in the Activate your CDRouter License section of the CDRouter Installation and Upgrade Guide.

Getting Help

If you have any questions about this procedure or run into any problems, please contact QA Cafe Customer Support, and we will be happy to help you.

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